Nathan Hale

by Mike Hewitt

     Nathan Hale was born in Goventry, Connecticut on the day of June 6, 1755.  As a young boy, Nathan was usually out playing with his friends or helping his mother with the household chores.

     Nathan lived with his mother and eleven siblings.  Their names were Jonathon, William, Amy, George, Susan, Edmund, Lucy, Thomas, Agitha, Michael, and Martha.  Nathan's father passed away when Nathan was two years  old.  Ever since then, the eldest brother looked after the family.

     The Hales were always a poor family and it was very hard to raise twelve children.  When Nathan turned six years old, he and his brothers would go out on the streets and shine shoes or other miscellaneous jobs for people that would pay them money to help the family income.

     When Nathan was thirteen, he was delivering a letter to the local saddle smith.  He was told to stop by a British patrolman; when Nathan heard this he began to run.  He was not paying attention and ran into two British soldiers, and in his many efforts to escape, his right ear was cut off by a patrolman.  Although Nathan's ear did heal, he suffered from several severe infections and had two surgeries.

     There was always something for Nathan to do in town: chores, running errands, shining shoes, and studying for college.  Nathan did this for the next one and one half years.

     One year later, when he was fifteen, Nathan enrolled a Yale College.  In 1770, Nathan received a teaching degree.  After graduating, Nathan taught school, ages ten through fifteen, for three years.

     In 1774, Nathan received a letter requesting that he be a lieutenant for the continental army.  Nathan accepted the request and was now called Lieutenant N. Hale.  One year later, he was promoted to captain.

     Nathan was well known to the army because he invented the "gun powder fired crossbow."  Nathan fought in twenty-three battles with his troops.  Nine of these battles he and his men retreated into the woods, where they would again fire upon the British.

     Nathan took part in many patriotic acts and protests against the British.  Some of these acts were the Boston Tea Party, The Stamp Act, in which the townspeople would reject all British goods.

     During the Stamp Act he and the local militia would tar and feather any British stamp or tax collector and tie them by their hand to the back of a horse and buggy and drag them down the road.  There were also peaceful ways of protest, such as making British dummies and hanging them from a tree or street lamp.  When the Boston Tea Party occurred, many people of Boston dressed as Native Americans and dumped a whole cargo of tea off a British ship into the Boston Harbor.  That is why people call the incident the Boston Tea Party.

     Nathan Hale died in September of 1776 as a result of being hanged for spying.  His last words were, "I only regret that I have but one life to live for my country."

Works Cited

Hale, Nathan.(2002, March) Retrieved from the world wide web March 19, 2002:  http://encarta.msn.com/find/concise.asp?z=1&pg=2&ti=76156119

Hale, Nathan.(2002, March) Retrieved from the world wide web March 19, 2002: http://www.armyrotc.uconn/hale.html

Hale, Nathan. (2002, March) Retrieved from the world wide we March 19, 2002:  http://earlyamerica.com/review/summer/quintumviri.html

Hale, Nathan.(2002, March) Retrieved from the world wide web March 19, 2002 http://www.ctssar.org/patriots/nathan_hale.htm

Hale, Nathan.(2002, March) Retrieved from the world wide web March 19, 2002 http://www.seanet.com/users/pamur/nhale.html

Hale, Nathan.(2002, March) retrieved from the world wide web March 19, 2002 http://www.lihistory.com/4/hs413a.htm

"Concise Encyclopedia of American Patriots." Compton's Encyclopedia. 1995ed., 332-345.

Hale, Nathan. CD-ROM. Danbury, CT.:   Grolier Multimedia Encyclopedia. 1998